......................................................................................................................................................................................................................
  “Sleight,” Shillam +
Smith 3, London, England, 1999  

  Solo exhibition  



 These drawings used Japanese calligraphic correction
ink–orange in color–and employed nontraditional drawing implements. The
drawings explored scale and ideas about how a line can be made. I mainly worked
in groups of three, starting with a less-developed drawing, small in scale in
relation to the paper. I would begin the next version on a new sheet in the
same location and with the same implement. Essentially, the second and third
drawings replicated the first but passed beyond it. The second drawing was a
middle marker and the third would only stop on arriving near the edges of the
paper.  



 As in my later drawings, the system that was set up and the
mark that was made became the framework within which the drawing developed–with
the variation in line created by the ability of the drawing tool to divest
itself of ink. The time expended gave the work its scale. The residue left on
the paper is also affected by how the drawing tool is held. The trace left by
the tool is a timeline of activity. The rhythm of strokes is seen in the uneven
blobs of ink and thinning lines which mark pauses for refill and repeated
beginnings. In a review in  Time Out,  Martin
Coomer writes: “Carmel Buckley has drawn a series of single and concentric
circles, each composed of small dots or lines in luminous orange ink which,
traditionally, is used in Japan as a correction ink. The project is fraught
with error; success hinges on the conflict between the perfection of the
intended circle and her inability to achieve it. An engaging installation.” At
this time my work in sculpture was concerned with imagined structures developed
from everyday found objects such as a brush or a tea strainer. Such found
objects launched a meditation on and an imaginary extension of these
structures. These sculptures used wire to suggest both volume and form while
simultaneously existing as a line in space. Through the use of fine wire I have
attempted to work in a way that suggests the work is coming into being or about
to disappear. 



 A catalogue with an essay by Paola Morsiani, then an
Assistant Curator at the Contemporary Arts Museum, Houston, TX (currently
Director of the Neuberger Museum of Art, Purchase College, SUNY), accompanied
the exhibition.  





   The exhibition was reviewed by Maria Walsh in  Art Monthly , “Carmel Buckley,” Shillam +
Smith 3, and by Martin Coomer, in  Time
Out . 





 ​

“Sleight,” Shillam + Smith 3, London, England, 1999

Solo exhibition

These drawings used Japanese calligraphic correction ink–orange in color–and employed nontraditional drawing implements. The drawings explored scale and ideas about how a line can be made. I mainly worked in groups of three, starting with a less-developed drawing, small in scale in relation to the paper. I would begin the next version on a new sheet in the same location and with the same implement. Essentially, the second and third drawings replicated the first but passed beyond it. The second drawing was a middle marker and the third would only stop on arriving near the edges of the paper.

As in my later drawings, the system that was set up and the mark that was made became the framework within which the drawing developed–with the variation in line created by the ability of the drawing tool to divest itself of ink. The time expended gave the work its scale. The residue left on the paper is also affected by how the drawing tool is held. The trace left by the tool is a timeline of activity. The rhythm of strokes is seen in the uneven blobs of ink and thinning lines which mark pauses for refill and repeated beginnings. In a review in Time Out, Martin Coomer writes: “Carmel Buckley has drawn a series of single and concentric circles, each composed of small dots or lines in luminous orange ink which, traditionally, is used in Japan as a correction ink. The project is fraught with error; success hinges on the conflict between the perfection of the intended circle and her inability to achieve it. An engaging installation.” At this time my work in sculpture was concerned with imagined structures developed from everyday found objects such as a brush or a tea strainer. Such found objects launched a meditation on and an imaginary extension of these structures. These sculptures used wire to suggest both volume and form while simultaneously existing as a line in space. Through the use of fine wire I have attempted to work in a way that suggests the work is coming into being or about to disappear.

A catalogue with an essay by Paola Morsiani, then an Assistant Curator at the Contemporary Arts Museum, Houston, TX (currently Director of the Neuberger Museum of Art, Purchase College, SUNY), accompanied the exhibition.

The exhibition was reviewed by Maria Walsh in Art Monthly, “Carmel Buckley,” Shillam + Smith 3, and by Martin Coomer, in Time Out.

Untitled - #7, Japanese paper, Japanese correction ink, 17 x 20.5 inches, 1999.jpg
Untitled - #6, Japanese paper, Japanese correction ink, 17 x 20.5 inches, 1999.jpg
Untitled - #9, Japanese paper, Japanese correction ink, 17 x 20.5 inches, 1999.jpg
Untitled - #11, Japanese paper, Japanese correction ink, 17 x 20.5 inches, 1999.jpg
Untitled - #5, Japanese paper, Japanese correction ink, 17 x 20.5 inches, 1999.jpg
Untitled - #4, Japanese paper, Japanese correction ink, 17 x 20.5 inches, 1999.jpg
Untitled - #1, Japanese paper, Japanese correction ink, 17 x 20.5 inches, 1999.jpg
Untitled - #12, Japanese paper, Japanese correction ink, 17 x 20.5 inches, 1999.jpg
Untitled - #3, Japanese paper, Japanese correction ink, 17 x 20.5 inches, 1999.jpg
Untitled - #2, Japanese paper, Japanese correction ink, 17 x 20.5 inches, 1999.jpg
Untitled - #8, Japanese paper, Japanese correction ink, 17 x 20.5 inches, 1999.jpg
Untitled - #10, Japanese paper, Japanese correction ink, 17 x 20.5 inches, 1999.jpg

Carmel Buckley–Shillam + Smith 3, installation, London

“Sleight,” Shillam + Smith 3, London, England, 1999

Solo exhibition

These drawings used Japanese calligraphic correction ink–orange in color–and employed nontraditional drawing implements. The drawings explored scale and ideas about how a line can be made. I mainly worked in groups of three, starting with a less-developed drawing, small in scale in relation to the paper. I would begin the next version on a new sheet in the same location and with the same implement. Essentially, the second and third drawings replicated the first but passed beyond it. The second drawing was a middle marker and the third would only stop on arriving near the edges of the paper.

As in my later drawings, the system that was set up and the mark that was made became the framework within which the drawing developed–with the variation in line created by the ability of the drawing tool to divest itself of ink. The time expended gave the work its scale. The residue left on the paper is also affected by how the drawing tool is held. The trace left by the tool is a timeline of activity. The rhythm of strokes is seen in the uneven blobs of ink and thinning lines which mark pauses for refill and repeated beginnings. In a review in Time Out, Martin Coomer writes: “Carmel Buckley has drawn a series of single and concentric circles, each composed of small dots or lines in luminous orange ink which, traditionally, is used in Japan as a correction ink. The project is fraught with error; success hinges on the conflict between the perfection of the intended circle and her inability to achieve it. An engaging installation.” At this time my work in sculpture was concerned with imagined structures developed from everyday found objects such as a brush or a tea strainer. Such found objects launched a meditation on and an imaginary extension of these structures. These sculptures used wire to suggest both volume and form while simultaneously existing as a line in space. Through the use of fine wire I have attempted to work in a way that suggests the work is coming into being or about to disappear.

A catalogue with an essay by Paola Morsiani, then an Assistant Curator at the Contemporary Arts Museum, Houston, TX (currently Director of the Neuberger Museum of Art, Purchase College, SUNY), accompanied the exhibition.

The exhibition was reviewed by Maria Walsh in Art Monthly, “Carmel Buckley,” Shillam + Smith 3, and by Martin Coomer, in Time Out.

Carmel Buckley–Shillam + Smith 3, installation, London

  “Sleight,” Shillam +
Smith 3, London, England, 1999  

  Solo exhibition  



 These drawings used Japanese calligraphic correction
ink–orange in color–and employed nontraditional drawing implements. The
drawings explored scale and ideas about how a line can be made. I mainly worked
in groups of three, starting with a less-developed drawing, small in scale in
relation to the paper. I would begin the next version on a new sheet in the
same location and with the same implement. Essentially, the second and third
drawings replicated the first but passed beyond it. The second drawing was a
middle marker and the third would only stop on arriving near the edges of the
paper.  



 As in my later drawings, the system that was set up and the
mark that was made became the framework within which the drawing developed–with
the variation in line created by the ability of the drawing tool to divest
itself of ink. The time expended gave the work its scale. The residue left on
the paper is also affected by how the drawing tool is held. The trace left by
the tool is a timeline of activity. The rhythm of strokes is seen in the uneven
blobs of ink and thinning lines which mark pauses for refill and repeated
beginnings. In a review in  Time Out,  Martin
Coomer writes: “Carmel Buckley has drawn a series of single and concentric
circles, each composed of small dots or lines in luminous orange ink which,
traditionally, is used in Japan as a correction ink. The project is fraught
with error; success hinges on the conflict between the perfection of the
intended circle and her inability to achieve it. An engaging installation.” At
this time my work in sculpture was concerned with imagined structures developed
from everyday found objects such as a brush or a tea strainer. Such found
objects launched a meditation on and an imaginary extension of these
structures. These sculptures used wire to suggest both volume and form while
simultaneously existing as a line in space. Through the use of fine wire I have
attempted to work in a way that suggests the work is coming into being or about
to disappear. 



 A catalogue with an essay by Paola Morsiani, then an
Assistant Curator at the Contemporary Arts Museum, Houston, TX (currently
Director of the Neuberger Museum of Art, Purchase College, SUNY), accompanied
the exhibition.  





   The exhibition was reviewed by Maria Walsh in  Art Monthly , “Carmel Buckley,” Shillam +
Smith 3, and by Martin Coomer, in  Time
Out . 





 ​
Untitled - #7, Japanese paper, Japanese correction ink, 17 x 20.5 inches, 1999.jpg
Untitled - #6, Japanese paper, Japanese correction ink, 17 x 20.5 inches, 1999.jpg
Untitled - #9, Japanese paper, Japanese correction ink, 17 x 20.5 inches, 1999.jpg
Untitled - #11, Japanese paper, Japanese correction ink, 17 x 20.5 inches, 1999.jpg
Untitled - #5, Japanese paper, Japanese correction ink, 17 x 20.5 inches, 1999.jpg
Untitled - #4, Japanese paper, Japanese correction ink, 17 x 20.5 inches, 1999.jpg
Untitled - #1, Japanese paper, Japanese correction ink, 17 x 20.5 inches, 1999.jpg
Untitled - #12, Japanese paper, Japanese correction ink, 17 x 20.5 inches, 1999.jpg
Untitled - #3, Japanese paper, Japanese correction ink, 17 x 20.5 inches, 1999.jpg
Untitled - #2, Japanese paper, Japanese correction ink, 17 x 20.5 inches, 1999.jpg
Untitled - #8, Japanese paper, Japanese correction ink, 17 x 20.5 inches, 1999.jpg
Untitled - #10, Japanese paper, Japanese correction ink, 17 x 20.5 inches, 1999.jpg
Carmel Buckley–Shillam + Smith 3, installation, London